Reporting to Parents

Traditionally, reporting to parents in most schools in New Zealand, has taken the form of a collection of written comments and assessment data produced by teachers. Reports have usually been out-of-date and therefore, of little practical use by the time they have been shared with whānau, having often been written several weeks before before being issued  This approach is now widely accepted by educators to be outdated and insufficient, if we are to take deliberate actions and if we are to work in genuine partnership with whānau to support the learning and progress of each child. 

At St Mary’s we believe in the importance of the voice of teachers, whānau and learners as partners in the reporting process. We believe that information should be current, accurate and informative to whānau and that it should form a part of the learning process for our children.

Learning Conversations

In response to this, reporting at St Mary’s will take the form of a number of learning conversations between teachers, whānau and learners as follows:

  • Start of the Year Conferences discussing:
    • whānau aspirations
    • learner strengths and areas for development
    • ways of communicating with each other
    • other needs the learner may have
  • Two learning progress conversations discussing all or some of the following:
    • The current learning of the child – what they can currently do and their next steps.
    • The progress the child has made since the last learning conversation.
    • The creation of a co-constructed plan aimed at ensuring the child is supported to make progress against their goals. 
    • Where the child is at in relation to curriculum expectations in reading, writing and mathematics. 
    • A discussion about the wider areas of the curriculum as appropriate. 
  • A third, shorter and more informal conversation to check in about the child’s learning in Term 3. 
  • Whānau Hui
    • Whānau of Year One and New Entrant learners will also be invited to a conversation after four or five weeks at school to discuss the assessment that has been undertaken for each learner and what can be done both at school and at home to support the child in their learning.

Class Dojo

We use Class Dojo as a tool for enabling parents to see in real-time, the learning that is taking place in their child’s hub. Hub teachers will endeavour to share photos and short explanations about some of the things that are taking place in the classroom on a daily basis. It is hoped that whānau will enjoy having a glimpse into the learning taking place in their child’s hub.